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The Makers of Things
#21
Here is a pair of ladies brigue jodpers I made for her in doors fitted with Vibram monoblock soles, calf leather linings, really tough walking boots for the hills or wearing out at the pub.

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Roman style sandles, made to the period drawing from archialogical finds and a pair of medieval military boots c 1420 pattern.

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My own hay down treaders or clogs, they have English Elm soles for toughness and in the Derby style, these keep my feet really warm in winter when I'm knocking around the yard and stood in the shed.

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Below is a pair of Ugg type boots for her in doors, half sheepskin lined with a full grain waterproof outer and crepe rubber soles for extra grip.

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My homemade gamekeeper style boots, taken from the Snowdon pattern of yesteryear, I had an old pair from the sixties so I back engineered them to gain the pattern, fitted with an Isthide commando sole.

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MyDutchlite style greenhouse that I made many years ago from Western Red Cedar, the whole superstructure was made on the table saw, where the beading for holding in the windows is sat, were cut out so that the wastestrips act as the strips to hold in the glass, I fitted a door at either end to allow for better air flow on the hottest day instead of opening windows which weaken the overall structure.

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The base is made from old scaffold boards that are well staked directly into the earth and then the greenhose is secured and screwed to that, the scaffold boards also act as the retainers for the beds and the soil, doing it myself saved me in the region of 2 grand on the retail which was at the time 2800.00 plus VAT.

Western Red Cedar is a superb timer against rot and she shold last at least 25-30 years without any treatment, we are nearly half way there already.
#22
A traditional gavel that I made from English Laburnum fitted with Sterling silver metalwork, the head ismade in three seperate pieces and screws together beneath the central furrule, then the handle is fitted through the soldered ferrule and into the timber itself, it also has a matching striking plate.

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A practice drum pad and sticks that I made but just never really got the hang of playing properly, I had severl lessons from a freind and ex Irish Gaurdsman and expet drummer, the pad is made of a thick section of sole leather and is fitted so as it is domed away from the wooden plate below, this aids the bounce and works very well, the sticks I made from English Holly and the other pair from Cox's Apple wood, bothe very hard wearing with good spring and response time.

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My own leather clams, these are the seated type where you place the cross bar at the bottom under your legs in the seating position and grasp the work by turning and closing the jaws, they work really well and hold really firmly as the jaws cannot be prised open, made from English Oak.

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#23
Here is a blast from the past, often called by the old greenwood workers or bodgers who worked out in the forests, An Old Grey Mare, you saddle the plank and use the foot powered lever to trap the timber to be worked on.
I made here about ten years agao and got it out today to do a video on it, click the link below for a close up of how it works.

https://www.bitchute.com/video/8JRFKiqJfWAP/


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#24
I made this bushcraft blade several years ago from an old metalwork file, I began by putting it into the old woodburning stove and left it in there all afternoon unti it had gone out then removed it the next morning. This took away all of the hardness/brittle crystaline nature out of it leaving it easily filed with another file and then I cleaned all of the rasp lines off of it.

Then I shaped it using an angle grinder and files and filed the cutting angle and choil into it and pre-sharpened it to somewhere near the finished edge before hardening and tempering it using a brine sollution to harden it and cold water for locking in the tempering stages.

To make your own brine sollution simply dissolve as much salt into your water as posible until you see the crystals not dissolving any more.
Or you can use old diesel or normal engine oil that is nice and black and full of old carbon deposits from the engine wear to re-harden the blade again.

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THe scabbard is made from a single piece of full grain vedge tanned shoulder leather with a middle section to mimic the thickness of the blade 4.50mm, and hand sewn using my home made waxed threads.

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The handle is made from solid ebony and has two solid brass rivets to hold everything in place.

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I left the blade with a semi blunt point for better durability, this means its not as good as a more pointed blade for drilling but it gives a stronger overall structure.

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Once I obtained the final shape I re-tempered it using the straw colour method, this is done by heating the cutting surface of the blade from the back edge towards the bussiness end until one sees a yellow straw colour come into view, then quickly quenching it in plain water as fast as possible to lock in the temper.

I have really hammerd this blade using wooden mallets and branches and it has stood up to everything I have thrown at it, it is not the best looking knife but keeps a very good edge indeed.

You can watch how I made it here, by following this fella.

https://vimeo.com/album/1577465
#25
there are a lot of free drum lessons on yt. i was teaching myself (or letting them teach me, lol) for a while.

and i painted my own drumsticks that i bought at the store. \o/ Wink
#26
(03-31-2018, 09:17 AM)freelotus Wrote: there are a lot of free drum lessons on yt. i was teaching myself (or letting them teach me, lol) for a while.

and i painted my own drumsticks that i bought at the store. \o/ Wink

I have a guy who was showing me the ropes, ex Irish Gaurds and really good but he now has family commitments and I have forgot most of what he taught me, you have to keep practicing which I haven't, I'm definately better at making them than playing them, but will get the sticks out again one day.

I might open a crafts training school this summer and fire up the old synapses again.
#27
(03-05-2018, 01:26 PM)The Apprentice Wrote: Over the years we have made lots of different things and one is this hair brush, made to make combing of long hair easier after it has just been washed, so many tools of this nature simply cannot handle thick long hair so I designed and hand turned this one. m
Made from solid Madagascan Ebony with three widely spaced rows of 1/8" solid Sterling silver tines in a staggered patern, this really makes the job so much easier and lets the wet or dry hair glide between them, the well rounded ends or each tine also massage the scalp nice and gently.

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You are very skilled. Just wanted to congratulate you on being able to make such beautiful things.
#28
(04-05-2018, 01:39 PM)ContemplationInTranquility Wrote:
(03-05-2018, 01:26 PM)The Apprentice Wrote: Over the years we have made lots of different things and one is this hair brush, made to make combing of long hair easier after it has just been washed, so many tools of this nature simply cannot handle thick long hair so I designed and hand turned this one. m
Made from solid Madagascan Ebony with three widely spaced rows of 1/8" solid Sterling silver tines in a staggered patern, this really makes the job so much easier and lets the wet or dry hair glide between them, the well rounded ends or each tine also massage the scalp nice and gently.

[Image: 20150101_005940_1.jpg]

You are very skilled. Just wanted to congratulate you on being able to make such beautiful things.

Thank you, it has taken a long time, it is who we are, creators, if given the choice more can still learn, once one takes the first step each one there after gets easier, the savings can run into four figures over a life time, it is a shame more don't do this.
#29
(03-31-2018, 10:09 AM)The Apprentice Wrote: I have a guy who was showing me the ropes, ex Irish Gaurds and really good but he now has family commitments and I have forgot most of what he taught me, you have to keep practicing which I haven't, I'm definately better at making them than playing them, but will get the sticks out again one day.

I might open a crafts training school this summer and fire up the old synapses again.

yes! an inconvenient truth. lol i doubt i've retained much of the lessons i got through online. was having more fun with my unstructured methods, prior to that, but then didn't have as much time and let it go altogether for the present. i want to get back to it, too, though. good luck!

any student in your school will be greatly blessed to be there. Smile
#30
The Apprentice, some fantastic work there! I especially like the leather tools, I do leatherwork but haven't made shoes yet apart from simple baby shoes. I'm more into tooling leather but have made leather tankards, belts and a couple of guitar straps.

What 3D CAD do you use? I use Solidworks at work and currently learning FreeCAD which has improved tremendously over the last year.
  


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