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BBC Springwatch Presenter Warns Of Imminent UK Ecological Collapse.
#1
Comment on BBC Springwatch Presenter Warns Of Imminent UK Ecological Collapse.. Post away!
#2
I like Chris Packham he tells it like it is and he really does care. I've seen this coming for years and got involved in the green movement when I was 15 which was some time ago now. It's only in recent years that I've come to realise why all the time, effort and money we put into activism and campaigning was never going to make any difference. To realise that what James Corbett calls the powers that shouldn't be were never going to listen or do anything about it. Nor sadly did most people.

Here in Cork I hardly ever see any birds these days. I'm allergic to bee stings and have to carry an epi-pen but I don't worry much now because it's so long since I actually saw a bee. We are heading for collapse without a doubt and either it will lead to a new and better beginning or our total extinction. I do feel for future generations of course but I sometimes wonder if as a species we actually deserve to survive. It really is heartbreaking.
#3
(06-14-2018, 06:56 PM)ContemplationInTranquility Wrote: I like Chris Packham he tells it like it is and he really does care. I've seen this coming for years and got involved in the green movement when I was 15 which was some time ago now. It's only in recent years that I've come to realise why all the time, effort and money we put into activism and campaigning was never going to make any difference. To realise that what James Corbett calls the powers that shouldn't be were never going to listen or do anything about it. Nor sadly did most people.

Here in Cork I hardly ever see any birds these days. I'm allergic to bee stings and have to carry an epi-pen but I don't worry much now because it's so long since I actually saw a bee. We are heading for collapse without a doubt and either it will lead to a new and better beginning or our total extinction. I do feel for future generations of course but I sometimes wonder if as a species we actually deserve to survive. It really is heartbreaking.

I often feel and think the same. Whilst there are some genuine good hearted human beings on this planet, sadly the majority are not. Human nature is riddled with evil and violence towards others and I wonder if this world can be saved. Have we gone too far to return to "normality"?  I feel very sorry for the young kids that will have to exist in the world that we will have in twenty years time, that is of course if we haven't destroyed the planet by then
#4
I live in the very heart of the wildest paarts of the Yorkshire Dales, here its a completely different story, there has been some decline in the wild flower meadows and clover has gone the way to more modern farming and silage methods on the larger farms, but the government have paid the smaller farmers not to intensify which gives their game away really, but we still have a plethora of wild insects and wildness in general, which I have show in my Shedlife blog on Bitchute of late.

I do however remember Packham filming some Kingfishers once and the chicks died due to the pit that they dug to film them being too draughty and letting a flow through of air from the pit they dug on the river bank, the young are pretty hairless and die of hyperthermia.

However, what he has not mentioned is the new farming regulations that came in around the late 80's early nineties that laid waste to many insects and wild flora due to the clean crop policy, here the farmers would loose huge amounts of money if they had a certain level of weed seed in their mono crops, thus forcing them to use chemicals both insecticides and herbicides in order to get the grain purity so the buyers did not have to filter out the wild flower seed themselves, it is policy that drives decline not just weather.

Here we still get at least half dozen butterflies over wintering in the house and we have lots of wild birds nesting all around us, one year we had a Blue Tit in the nesting box under the eaves of the shed and right on top of it was a Wrens nest, both parents used to take turns at landing on the garden wall and wait until each parent bird had fed their chicks before moving up to feed the other chicks in the box.

Packham is talking about urban populations but if you have watched the Isle of Man TT recently you still see hundreds of flies on the racers fairings today, it all depends upon where you live.

I have a good book by Dennis Summers Smith called "On Sparrows and Man", here he studdied the life of the worlds sparrows and noticed a huge decline in London where there were thousands that would come and feed from your hand, yet in Paris their numbers had not changed that much, and it is my guess that something was effecting them could have been an experiment on us instead which also effected them and other birds and their staple diet which is insects.

Other than modern farming practices I think there is something more sinister going on and we are now witnessing nature speaking out loudly wherever there are large populations of humans, where as in the counrties wilder regions there has been less changes.

I don't fully trust Packham and his employers at the British BS corporation which he has had to tow thire climate line, get him to come here and see hundreds of bumble bees and flora.

Below is my own collection of some of our flora and fauna.

https://steemit.com/wild/@shedlife/flowe...hire-dales

(06-14-2018, 07:06 PM)awakened53 Wrote:
(06-14-2018, 06:56 PM)ContemplationInTranquility Wrote: I like Chris Packham he tells it like it is and he really does care. I've seen this coming for years and got involved in the green movement when I was 15 which was some time ago now. It's only in recent years that I've come to realise why all the time, effort and money we put into activism and campaigning was never going to make any difference. To realise that what James Corbett calls the powers that shouldn't be were never going to listen or do anything about it. Nor sadly did most people.

Here in Cork I hardly ever see any birds these days. I'm allergic to bee stings and have to carry an epi-pen but I don't worry much now because it's so long since I actually saw a bee. We are heading for collapse without a doubt and either it will lead to a new and better beginning or our total extinction. I do feel for future generations of course but I sometimes wonder if as a species we actually deserve to survive. It really is heartbreaking.

I often feel and think the same. Whilst there are some genuine good hearted human beings on this planet, sadly the majority are not. Human nature is riddled with evil and violence towards others and I wonder if this world can be saved. Have we gone too far to return to "normality"?  I feel very sorry for the young kids that will have to exist in the world that we will have in twenty years time, that is of course if we haven't destroyed the planet by then

I used to think like this but something in me told another story, it is to do with generational ignorance and therefore not the childrens or their parents fault, if we as a nation could gain control of the education system all could be reversed in only one genertion.

If we concentrated on what was really needed for our survival and left go of religious dogma and the global debt generators we could easily see past the dogma and rhetoric that has slowly but surely stagnated our intuition, there is so much doom and gloom and how we have been taken for a ride, but never enough true alternatives with which to put to use to begin the healing processes, and my model of real life skills and the problem solving that comes with it is one of the very best healing properties there is.

In my humble opinion, we are what we make and have always lived or died by the things we create.
  


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